Home > theology > My Ex-Gay Friend (NYTimes)

My Ex-Gay Friend (NYTimes)

I recently bought Michael Brown’s new book A Queer Thing Happened to America: And what a long strange journey its been. And I’m waiting for the Apologetics Group to finish their DVD, Is Gay OK?

This is an issue that Christians need to become more involved in – and I don’t simply mean politically. I mean taking time to seriously understand all of the issues involved. It’s not enough to point to a few verses to complete your understanding of homosexual sin. I’ll have more to say on this in the future, but for now, here are some links worth reading.

“You have to understand something,” he said, leaning forward in his chair. “I don’t see people as gay anymore. I don’t see you as gay. I don’t see him as gay. God creates us heterosexual. We may get other ideas in our head about what we are, and I certainly did, but that doesn’t mean they’re the truth.”

My Ex-Gay Friend (NY Times)

I did not always believe as I now do about homosexuals. I used to believe homosexuality was a choice due to a perverse sexual lust that homosexuals refused to control, and that “sexual orientation” was merely a political euphemism calculated to divest the issue of homosexuality of any sense of responsibility. Furthermore, since I saw that the Bible condemned homosexuals, the plumbing didn’t match up, and radical gay activists were off in the deep end, the question of choice seemed like a pretty open and shut case…

…I want to tell my gay friends that the Reformed faith has answers for them. Most evangelical Christians can only offer them the Pelagian answer that all sin is a choice, and since homosexuality is a sin, it too must be a choice, and unless they can choose it away they will perish. I want to tell my gay friends that even if they didn’t choose their homosexuality it is still a sin, and they will still be judged by God because their plight is the plight of all mankind. We are all doomed to perish not [just] because of our sinful choices but because of the imputation of Adam’s sin to our account and the inherited corruption of our nature. The doctrine of original sin is extraordinarily difficult for most people to swallow because it says that we had no choice in the matter of our eternal fate. It speaks of our utterly helpless and hopeless condition before a holy God, and people don’t want that. Instead they want to fool themselves into believing that they can still choose to be moral.

But the homosexual is not fooled. He knows differently. He experiences every day what it means to be truly powerless to morally redeem himself, and every day he must live in the misery of that condition. I want to tell gays and lesbians about the good news of justification through the imputation of Christ’s righteousness to their account, exhort them to take hold of Christ by faith, and like Abraham who contemplated his own body to be as good as dead, to look away from themselves and ahead to the promise of the resurrection of the body (Romans 4:19-25).

Calvinists, Pelagians, and Homosexuality

 

 

 

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Categories: theology
  1. paul
    June 29, 2011 at 2:08 am

    Very well written. The benefit to suffering with homosexuality, or other abnormal orientations, is that we are constantly aware of our great need.

    Like

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