Reformed and Baptist: The Third Wave

Here’s the summary of a good post by Jeremy Walker over at Reformation 21:

So, when the issue of what it means to be Reformed gets discussed, we ask not to be lauded and applauded, so much as simply, accurately and fairly recognised as existing. It may be that you just did not realise that we exist. It may be that the kind of Baptist convictions – about soteriology, ecclesiology, pneumatology, doxology and a whole bunch of other ologies – to which you have been exposed have left you with some serious and significant questions, and you have given up looking for the answers among Baptists. It may be that you have met some who take the name of Reformed Baptists who, through pride or ignorance, have left you with a sour taste in your mouth, for which I am sorry. It may be – and I say this in a spirit of straightforward inquiry and not backhanded accusation – that you would rather not acknowledge this part of the spectrum because it does not fit into your historical narrative, and rather upsets your carefully piled apple-cart. But please do not repeat the old saw about Anabaptism; if I might be so bold, it will not wash. Neither dismiss us with the vague assertion that there are some Baptists out there who are both Calvinistic in their soteriology and traditional or conservative in our doxology. That is not what we really are, certainly not all we are. An honest historiography surely requires that – if nothing else – those original Particular Baptists (discounting, of course, the apostles and the early church!) are at least considered on their own terms, and taken for what they believed themselves to be, even if you might disagree with them.

Reformed and Baptist: the third wave

4 thoughts on “Reformed and Baptist: The Third Wave

  1. Hello, I think your website might be having browser compatibility issues.
    When I look at your blog in Opera, it looks fine but when opening in Internet Explorer,
    it has some overlapping. I just wanted to give you a quick heads
    up! Other then that, excellent blog!

    Like

  2. markmcculley

    Nathan Finn—But there have been some worthwhile initial attempts at a history. My friend David Scott wrote a short historical article for the now-defunct Baptist Reformation Review back in 1974. Mark McCulley’s Studies in History and Ethics (1983) includes some relevant chapters. Leon McBeth included several pages of information in his The Baptist Heritage (1987), and Tom Nettles includes some helpful material in the updated version of By His Grace and For His Glory (2006).

    http://www.nathanfinn.com/2010/07/14/can-baptists-be-reformed-part-3/

    https://chantrynotes.wordpress.com/2013/10/07/presbyterians-baptists-it-doesnt-have-to-be-this-way/

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s