Considering Marriage

Like most of you, I’ve thought a fair bit about marriage over the last decade.

When I went off to school and started developing a more libertarian mindset, I formed the opinion that the state shouldn’t have anything to do with marriage. It should be left up to the church.

Then, attending school in California, I was confronted with Prop 8. Since the state wasn’t leaving marriage alone, how should I vote? I voted Yes on Prop 8 because we are not free to define marriage contrary to God’s Word, but I still wasn’t convinced the state should be involved.

But then I began learning more about reformed theology and history and realized that the reformation took marriage out of the church (where Rome made it a sacrament) and placed it in the hands of the civil authorities. In fact, some colonies went so far as to defrock any minister who attempted to perform a marriage.

I never got around to finishing that study, but thankfully I’ve found a series of posts I can say summarize my current view of the matter:

2 thoughts on “Considering Marriage

  1. Matthew Stahl

    The links to the resources on this page seem to be out of date. Can you post the correct links? I would love to follow up with these resources. Thanks.

    Like

    1. Hey Matt, here you go

      https://web.archive.org/web/20190727183613/http://reformedlibertarian.com/articles/philosophy/considering-marriage-part-one/

      https://web.archive.org/web/20190716202720/http://reformedlibertarian.com/articles/society/considering-marriage-part-two/

      https://web.archive.org/web/20160416170635/http://reformedlibertarian.com/blog/do-civil-liberties-demand-that-christians-support-same-sex-marriage/

      https://web.archive.org/web/20191108150146/http://reformedlibertarian.com/blog/considering-rc-sproul-on-marriage/

      See also Hodge’s helpful comments here (scroll down to sub-section titled Marriage a Divine Institution) https://www.ccel.org/ccel/hodge/theology3.iii.v.xi.html

      As the essence of the marriage contract is the mutual compact of the parties in the sight of God and in the presence of witnesses, it is not absolutely necessary that it should be celebrated by a minister of religion or even by a civil magistrate. It may be lawfully solemnized, as among the Quakers, without the intervention of either.

      With regards to libertarianism and the question of whether civil government may regulate marriage, please see my post A Note on Reformed Libertarianism for my present position, in general. https://contrast2.wordpress.com/2020/06/30/a-note-on-reformed-libertarianism/

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s